Welcome

COVID-19 Response


Dear friends and family of the Rapids Theatre.

Thank you for all your support through these trying and uncertain times. We were forced to close for an extended time do to COVID-19 restrictions as you all know.

We are reopening with certain restrictions to protect the public from spreading the COVID-19 virus not the least of which is reducing our capacity by 75%. The other issue we have to deal with was the postponement of major acts into 2021. So, we will be changing our business model to bring in the best of our regions many tribute bands.

Our new schedule will initially be Friday and Saturday nights as we phase in National acts when they become available. See our website and Facebook for more details in the near future.

Thank you for your continued support!



All previously purchased tickets for the Tesla Show will be honored at new date. Refunds available at points of purchase.



Attention Ticket Holders


We hope this message finds everyone well and staying safe and healthy. We would like to begin by saying that we continue to make our way through an unprecedented event in the history of this country. No one could have predicted this chain of events which was caused by the mandated closure of not only our business but millions of others. We remain closed since mid March and there has been no one in our offices to answer questions or comments regarding operations. We put out a few announcements about how to deal with some of the questions we have had regarding ticket refunds. Apparently there has been some confusion by a very few people who purchased tickets out of the thousands that have been sold. Some of the confusion has resulted in some negative comments on social media without having a true understanding of the situation.

The Rapids has over 33,000 Facebook friends, the vast majority of whom have been very kind and understanding regarding the COVID-19 issues. We have announced that the shows we had scheduled for this year have been canceled or postponed until 2021.

As you can imagine from watching the news regarding sports and music events, our whole industry is in an upheaval full of uncertainty regarding the future. We want to say thank you to the thousands of people who have elected to keep their tickets for use when these concerts are rescheduled. Please see our earlier announcements on the incentives we have offered as a thank you to those people.

Let me explain a few things about how the Rapids ticket refund policy works as well as how placing shows at the Rapids works. Hopefully it will help those who are most vocal understand our position. First of all as we have stated many times, the Rapids can not return ticket money per our contract with our ticket vendor which is Etix. We have a contract with them which says as follows and I quote, "ALL TICKET REFUNDS MUST COME THROUGH ETIX". The reason for this is that you bought your tickets through Etix and they have all of your credit card information, etc. If we started returning money you could also go back to Etix and claim it again. We have had other ticket vendors in the past and they all operate the same way. We understand that Etix as well as other ticket vendors have very reduced operations during this pandemic and have been very hard to reach as well. The only other suggestion that we have if you must have a refund is to dispute it on your credit card.

Many shows are brought in by outside promoters. We often do act as the promoter but there are many times that other people rent our room, therefore we have very little control over the logistics of these shows. In these cases, we have no information on cancellations, ticket refunds etc.. The Tesla show and Ministry shows are two examples. For information on ticket refunds for the Tesla and Ministry shows, please send an email to and we'll refer you to the promoters for those shows.

The Rapids theater has an excellent reputation as can be seen by the numerous awards we have won over our 11 year history and we continue to strive to become a great venue to listen to live music.

We hope this addresses some of the confusion in regards to refunds. As we continue to navigate through these unprecedented times faced by all businesses in our Country, we thank you again for understanding.



Judah & the Lion

For Judah & the Lion, the last two years should've been the best of their lives as the Nashville band toured behind a powerful single and a genre-upending album, sharing stages with heroes and playing to oceans of fans. But as everything was coming together for them, singer-guitarist Judah Akers' world was falling apart as his family was hit by alcoholism and affairs, death and divorce. From that tension comes Pep Talks, the trio's third LP and a hard left turn into deeply personal terrain. Knowing they had something new on their hands, Judah, Brian Macdonald (mandolin), and Nate Zuercher (banjo) took their time crafting a set of songs that not only shores up their one-of-a-kind sound—a heart-pounding whirl of folk, bluegrass, rock, hiphop and electronic production—but takes the listener on a bracingly candid, surprisingly anthemic journey from the kind of pain that tears your whole world apart to the sort of hard-won hope that can bridge the deepest of rifts.

"Up to this point, the band's message has mostly been: 'Live your best life! Pursue your dreams! Follow your heart!'" says Judah, "We had to start this record with broken-ness, with this cry that says, 'I don't want to hide this from anyone anymore. I'm going through something. I need help.'"

The first songs released from Pep Talks also open the album and they drop us right into Judah's struggle. Epic overture "Pep Talk" is a wordless swell of anxiety, woe, resolve and musical might that feeds right into "Quarter-Life Crisis." There, over a piano-pounding track that'd make Arcade Fire shout along, Judah admits to feeling alone and powerless, in need of support. With the next track "Why Did You Run?"—a Zedd-evoking trip into organic-goes-digital EDM—we start to see why he feels that way as the people he used to rely on end up in jail or absentee, leaving behind "a lost kid looking for a home he once knew." And on "i'm ok." he spells it out: his aunt has died (of an overdose), his parents are splitting up for good, and he's on the road, unable to face it all. The song goes through a transformation both aural and lyrical, from upbeat rock to moody rap as Judah first brushes off his friends' concerns, then admits, "I'm not okay, come get my pain."

"In the middle of all of this it was very hard for me to admit to myself I wasn't doing good," says Judah. "I'd get texts from people checking in. I'd always say, 'I'm okay,' but inside I was almost annoyed, which is an awful response, like, 'Just stop asking. I don't want to think about it.' That forced me to go, 'No, this is exactly why I do need to think about it: I need to process things.'"

Many of Pep Talks' songs were written on the bus after the band's high energy shows, emotions and scenes flooding Judah's head as he struggled to sleep. Empathy courses through yearning on the Kacey Musgraves duet "pictures" as he writes from the point of view of his mom packing up the family home. Entropy reigns in the relentless, synth-and-banjo-driven "Over my head" where he tries in vain to push the pain away: "Hydrate, caffeinate, medicate, repeat." Acoustic tearjerker "Queen Songs / human." is steeped in nostalgia, Judah recalling childhood memories of his mother back before her drinking got too bad to ignore, while its surging coda "human." (which incorporates a poem by Judah and his sister) attempts to find common ground in the present. And then there's the snarling, trap-addled, bass-dropping "Don't Mess with My Mama," inspired by an actual fistfight between Judah and his dad over the latter's affairs in the middle of all the Akers family strife.

"We wanted a song that matched the level of intensity I was feeling at the time, being so angry at someone you love so much," says Judah. "For the last chorus, we all took our shirts off, got our headphones on, turned it up way too loud and started screaming nonsense into the mic."

Judah & the Lion has been a family unto itself since forming at Nashville's Belmont University in 2011. Judah was from nearby Cookeville, an aspiring baseball player with a secret love for folk guitar. Brian came from Chicagoland and was mostly obsessed with piano. Nate, a Coloradan, was a son of symphony players but preferred metal. Their differences were their strength as they shaped their sound over a bluegrass-heavy debut, Kids These Days, and its mold-breaking follow-up Folk Hop n' Roll, both produced by Dave Cobb (Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell) and made in under two weeks. For Pep Talks, they took three months, coproduced as a band alongside two friends (Brian's college roomie Drew Long and local artist Daniel James), and kept the guest list tight: drummer Darren King (ex Mutemath), a hero to the guys; Kacey, whose transcendent Golden Hour was a powerful influence; and genre-flouting tour buddy, Jon Bellion.

"We've never had an environment that was so relaxed—where everybody could speak so freely and be themselves and have fun," says Brian. Nate adds, "Judah's openness was inspiring, and I feel so much more ownership with this project because we all decided to believe in ourselves."

In fact, the swaggering, bouncy Bellion feature, "Passion Fashion" testifies to that sentiment as Judah sings "I got ambition, yeah I'm on a mission ... there's no stopping me now, Imma do me." If that lyric seems out of step with what you know of Pep Talks so far, that's because we skipped ahead a few songs. Just past the LP's halfway mark, Judah starts healing. "7000x" is a humble fight song whose moody groove nods to those other underdogs (and friends) twenty one pilots. The dubwise "JOYBOY" beams its powerful mantra. "GoofBallerz" is pure release, a self-aware ditty that captures the humor and ease of the band's gigs, while "Dance with Ya" shows our host at home with his wife, seeking tranquility. The philosophy that Judah slowly forged by the fire of his trials is laid out on the battered but bliss-beaming "Alright (frick it!)": "No matter how bad all this gets, I can't stop this voice in my head / This voice in my head says, We’re gonna be alright!"

"That chorus really started as a motto between me and my siblings—a message of camaraderie and triumph to carry us through," says Judah. The extended ring finger in the album art signifies this too—it's an old Akers family sign meaning, roughly, "frick it." "With these songs, we want to establish a culture of no matter what you're going through—depression, family stuff, hard times, whatever—there's always reason to move forward. At the end of the day, we're in this together."

It's a thing you can actually feel as you work your way through Pep Talks. The group got closer and better as Nate and Brian encouraged Judah to share his truth, and the intentionality of his recovery was in turn reflected by the music. Similarly, once they got to the other side, the Akers too were in a better place: stronger, realer and more honest about who they are, where they've been and what's next. Because the point of sharing all this hard truth isn't to shame anyone; It's the opposite really, the idea that being broken and admitting it is unifying—fallibility is our most common trait and if we sing about it from a stage, others will sing along. To that end, if "Quarter- Life Crisis" was a cry for help, album closer "Family / Best is Yet to Come" is an answer. Judah's mom speaks first, leaving him a teary voicemail after her first listen through Pep Talks. And soon we hear his reply before the song builds to its staggering crescendo: "You're not alone in this."

Event Properties

Event Date 09-19-2019
Individual Price $25.50 - $90.50
Supporting Acts Flora Cash
Door Opens 7:00 pm
Showtime 8:00 pm
Location
Rapids Theatre
1711 Main St, Niagara Falls, NY 14305, USA
Rapids Theatre
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Some of the paranormal activity known to be happening at Rapids Theatre are voices and footsteps being heard, doors opening and closing, a mysterious whistling with keys jingling, and even sightings of full blown apparitions. - - - Read More
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Phone:
716-205-8925

Address:
1711 Main Street
Niagara Falls, NY 14305


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